18
Jan
10

Open

Closed systems are well-defined and profitable, but only for those who control them. Open systems are chaotic and profitable, but only for those who understand them well and move faster than everyone else. Closed systems grow quickly while open systems evolve more slowly, so placing your bets on open requires the optimism, will, and means to think long term. Fortunately, at Google we have all three of these.

Open will win. It will win on the Internet and will then cascade across many walks of life: The future of government is transparency. The future of commerce is information symmetry. The future of culture is freedom. The future of science and medicine is collaboration. The future of entertainment is participation. Each of these futures depends on an open Internet.

From “The meaning of open” posted on the Google Policy Blog on December 21st 2009 by Jonathan Rosenberg, Senior Vice President for Product Management.

26
May
08

Michael Zhao’s Video Compilation

Vodpod videos no longer available.

posted with vodpod

17
May
08

Beichuan: a vision of hell

China has, cautiously, welcomed some foreign input. When Mr Wen first visited the town he spotted an American doctor, Brian Robinson of the Heart to Heart aid outfit, walking with other volunteers along the road and he ordered the car to stop. He embraced the doctor, thanked him and told him to go to Beichuan and help. An unprecedented action.

17
May
08

Silent suffering of quake victims – CNN.com

Perhaps the most poignant experience came while we were talking to the local party secretary in Che Jia Va, who gave us directions and pointed out various landmarks — all the while keeping a stoic face. The town was once home to 13,000 people, and 3,000 are still missing, he says.

17
May
08

China’s Holistic Censorship Regime

In fact, conflating the interests of the Chinese Communist Party with the interests of businesses operating in China is what makes China Inc. work. For the last 30 years, China has been building a social system that establishes an identity between business and broader political or social interests.
Does this work well in promoting the kind of stability so cherished by the Party leadership? It may be that, in China’s diverse social system, forcing companies to act like cabinet ministers—and cabinet ministers to act like company executives—is a necessary cost of social harmony. Or, it may only be a necessary cost of prolonging the political life of the Chinese Communist Party. As we know from our political catechism, continuing one-party rule and maintaining social stability are really exactly the same thing.

12
May
08

Sichuan Earthquake

A school in Chengdu

Vodpod videos no longer available. from www.drumsnwhistles.c posted with vodpod

09
May
08

“We Are Not Free”

“It’s as if they want to change the way we are,” said a lama about the Chinese authorities. Monks in Tibet are struggling to continue practicing their faith in the face of huge political pressure.




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